About SupplyChainSage

While it may be bold to claim the status of Sage...I have compiled over 200 projects across all supply chain domains over a 25 year career in the field of Supply Chain Management. I have often been called other things by people during that time...some as flattering, some not. I am adopting this name because at this point in my career, there is not a situation that I would be intimidated by...I feel like I could walk into most any company and find a way to add value within a week.

supplychainsage

PAB_SCOR Level 3, 4, 5 Deliver

The Supply Chain Council, of which I was a member for many years, has developed what I think is the best approach to looking at Supply Chain Processes among the many individual methodologies in existence.  My history with the Council through my tenures at 3M, Imation, Ryder, Huhtamaki (Chinet), Satellite Logisitics, and North Highland Consulting have given me a great opportunity to serve on the Technical Committees that helped to develop the content of the model.  Pride of authorship aside (I can’t actually point to much that was an original idea of mine) there is little out in the ether that can help a company to describe their Supply Chain operations particularly with their suppliers and customers better than the SCOR Model.

When looking at the model’s sections: PLAN, SOURCE, MAKE, DELIVER, and RETURN at multiple levels you can chart our your supply chain…

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SCOR Model – Level 4

Aside

PAB_SCOR Level 3, 4, 5 Deliver

The Supply Chain Council, of which I was a member for many years, has developed what I think is the best approach to looking at Supply Chain Processes among the many individual methodologies in existence.  My history with the Council through my tenures at 3M, Imation, Ryder, Huhtamaki (Chinet), Satellite Logisitics, and North Highland Consulting have given me a great opportunity to serve on the Technical Committees that helped to develop the content of the model.  Pride of authorship aside (I can’t actually point to much that was an original idea of mine) there is little out in the ether that can help a company to describe their Supply Chain operations particularly with their suppliers and customers better than the SCOR Model.

When looking at the model’s sections: PLAN, SOURCE, MAKE, DELIVER, and RETURN at multiple levels you can chart our your supply chain (or multiple supply chains) very easily.  You can also determine at a pretty granular level gaps that may exist in process where improvements can be made – due to the multi-level metrics associated with the processes shown at “Level 3” of the Model.  However, that is typically where the model ends.  The idea of stopping at Level 3 is that it would be difficult to create a standard at any level below that because of unique processes or business characteristics that would make if very difficult for members to agree on any standard.  But SCOR Practitioners don’t have to stop there…decomposition at level 4 or even level 5 can get to the heart of procedures and even tasks that are out of alignment with best practices in Supply Chain Operations.

I have put together some samples of Level 4 approaches that may be used in a diagnostic business process review.  Feel free to use the attached and let me know how it works out for you.  If I get some response…I will publish some others.  Have fun with it…

Patrick